PLAYBOUR

Artists participate in the exhibition Playbour take three material closely related to Taiwan’s development, including cane sugar, sulfur, and coral as their points of departure, respectively. The artists explore the cultural memories hidden beneath folds of natural landscape that stretch across the flatlands, mountains, and oceans, which interweave with the distribution of industrial resources.

The landscape explored in this exhibition originates in Taiwan; yet, it also reveals the traces and marks of violence, war, colonization, and the geopolitical battle between Taiwan and other nations. From this, we may also find out that choices of all kinds of interests, sentimental value and material worth are greatly influenced by globalization at large. In comparison, the artists attempt to manifest the increasingly latent ideological tendency of interest and profit and the intensifying interrelation of body-society with their physical movements and the transition of senses. Here come the issues: How do the laboring (restricted, exploited, and moralized) bodies formulate the contemporary scenes of everyday life? How does today’s material and spiritual culture shape every individual?

As the natural treasures are transformed and mutated in the process of chrysopoeia, they continue to intrigue humankind and propel them to a divided, precarious, and antagonistic bio-political situation. As intellectuals, while artists are concerning the thoughtful intervention and practices of the history of laboring, they may attempt to find a focal point in the process of dynamic struggle, using imagination (or practices) to reverse everyday life.

LIN Yi-Chun

(b.1990)

Good at telling stories by complexing different media especially objects, texts and images, Lin’s practice tries to capture phases of transition within the modern daily system and explores the transformation and fluidity of the identity and value. Her research and interests include the production of materials in relation to memory, the spatiality of time, duration and process in space, and the relationship between object and documentation. She believes that art practice should always synchronize with real life and therefore explores the boundaries of reality and imagination. Her current practice focus on connecting experimental narratives between literature and installation and their organic interaction with society.
LIN Yi-Chun
Burning Stone: Hot Archives
2021
Single channel video
6’36”
LIN Yi-Chun
Burning Stone
2021
Sulfur powder, pencil on paper, light clay, ready-made sulfide (rubber skin, tires, sealing strip, foam thread, etc.),
raw rubber, iron wire, wire, computer embroidery on towel, digital print, live performance,sand , cultivate soi, plaster,
copel bark(found object) , high-density sponge, sound

Dimensions variable
LIN Yi-Chun
Burning Stones: Sulfide 01
2021
Sealing strip, wire, elastic rope, iron wire, stainless steel,
vulcanized rubber sheet and pedestal

22x25x127cm
LIN Yi-Chun
Burning Stones: Sulfide 02
2021
Sealing strip, wire, elastic rope, iron wire, stainless steel,
vulcanized rubber sheet and pedestal

30x20x127cm

CHANG Chih-Chung

(b.1986)

Chang’s artworks deal with those rapid-changing environments like ship, island, water as well as port, and through textural and spatial processes of investigation, collection, interweave and reconstruction, in which he tries to unveil the universal experiences of the tension and grey area between human, civilization and nature constantly shaping each other.

His works are usually realized based on a core narrative text, and integrate with keen craftsmanship multiple forms and media including video, installation, photography, painting, documents as well as site-specific project and workshop, etc. Chang was the co-founder of alternative art space Waley Art located in western Taipei and, he is also an avid observer of the role of maritime culture in public education and knowledge systems in Taiwan.
CHANG Chih-Chung
The Coral Island
2021
Fishing net, ocean debris (hauling lines), coral stones,
metal equipment, ready-mades, laser level, framed printed documents, LED light

Dimensions variable
CHANG Chih-Chung
The Coral Stone 1
2021
Hauling lines (ocean debris), metal equipment, coral stones

Dimensions variable
CHANG Chih-Chung
The Coral Stone 2
2021
Hauling lines (ocean debris), metal equipment, coral stones

Dimensions variable
CHANG Chih-Chung
Xinbei Island
2016
Cyanotype on paper, aluminum frame (monoprint)

115x65cm
CHANG Chih-Chung
Xinbei Island
2016
Cyanotype on paper, aluminum frame (monoprint)

90x65cm

LO Yi-Chun

(b.1985)

Lo Yi-Chun creates sculpture, photographs and installations about environmental change and farmland issues. In 2013, She created a series of work from banana peels to explore the market relationship between Taiwan and Japan, and the impact of global market in nowadays society. Recently, she works on the theme of Taiwanese tobacco industry with fieldwork, documentation and literature, trying to derive the historical context of Taiwanese industrial landscape under the global economic system.
LO Yi-Chun
Climbing in the geological site
2021
Sandstone, sulfur, shale, andesite, plaster, single channel video

Dimensions variable
LO Yi-Chun
Blockhouse
2021
Sulfur, shale, andesite, plaste

78× 21× 22cm
LO Yi-Chun
Molasses, Ethanol, Fitness Workshops, Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Life So Different, So Appealing?
(Fitness Program-3)
2021
Bagasse, tobacco, plaster, iron, steel

142×70×70cm
LO Yi-Chun
Cuttle-Fish Hoe2
2021
Iron, wooden stick, plaster, lacquer

31×9×21cm
LO Yi-Chun
Cuttle-Fish Hoe3
2021
Iron, wooden stick, plaster, lacquer

29×12×16cm
LO Yi-Chun
Intent/Intense Movement
2021
Animation, sketch paper

0’34”